facebook twitter mail share

Engineering students at Washington State University are developing an unmanned aerial vehicle powered by liquid hydrogen. The focus on hydrogen power came after the successful flight of a 55 pound battery-powered plane known as GENII. Hydrogen is environmentally friendly, but extracting energy from it can be a challenge. The plane employs a†PM fuel cell to convert hydrogen and oxygen from the air into power.†Unmanned planes could be used in applications such as farming, wildfire monitoring, or emergency communications networks.

 

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Researchers at Washington State University’s School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering are working to engineer safer sports balls. The group developed a virtual softball model

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University recently received grant funding from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to study the effect of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) on the body, and drugs to counteract those effects using its Organs-on-Chips technology. Organs-on-chips are tiny microfluidic devices lined with human cells that mimic the complex physiology of organs such as the heart, lungs, or stomach.

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Engineers at the

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Engineers at the Germany company Festo have developed a flying robot inspired by the dragonfly. Like the dragonfly, the BionicOpter can maneuver in all directions, glide, hover, make sharp turns, accelerate and decelerate quickly, and fly backwards.

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Engineers at Stanford University are working on a new space rover that may someday traverse Phobos, the largest moon of Mars. The researchers have nicknamed the rover the hedgehog, because in ten years its final form will resemble a spiky titanium soccer ball. Exploring Phobos is challenging since its gravity levels are thousands of times less than those on Earth. To combat this challenge, the rover will be designed to operate without wheels. Instead, the engineers have enclosed spinning motors inside to make it tumble and hop. The research team is

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

A new activity monitoring tool known as Sqord combines computer games, social media, and exercise to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic.

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Structural engineers at the University of California, San Diego conducted a grand-scale experiment to find out how the inside of a structure is impacted when an earthquake strikes. The engineers constructed an 80-foot-high model hospital complete with an elevator, stairs, wiring, heating and air conditioning, electrical, computers, and medical equipment on a massive shake table. The building was equipped with hundreds of cameras and sensors to record what happened inside during a simulated earthquake.

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

A team of professors and students at the University of Tennessee developed the ultra tough microchips used to control motors on NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory RoverCuriosity.†Eighty of these paperclip-sized Quad Operational Amplifier (op amp) microchips are used to power the rover’s forty motors. The chips enable Curiosity to carry out motorized tasks including moving about the Martian surface, taking photos with its camera, or gathering samples with its robotic arm.

Categories: 

facebook twitter mail share

Engineers at Rice University are experimenting with a method of developing lithium-ion batteries using painted components. Traditional lithium-ion batteries consist of layers of different materials rolled into a cylindrical shape. This design makes it difficult to shrink the size of the batteries for use in mobile devices. This new method involves painting battery components onto layers using lithium cobalt oxide, lithium titanium oxide, and conductive single-walled nanotube paint.

Categories: 

Pages

Quickstart: we have resources for Students, Parents, Teachers, and Guidance Counselors