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dog noseEngineers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed a device that can biomimic a dog’s scent receptors to identify various molecules. The device uses the molecule’s vibrational spectrum as a sort of fingerprint for identification.

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Engineers at Duke University have developed a new material that when applied to a ship’s barnacles on shippaint, can literally shake off bacteria.

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computer chipsEver had to bring a smartphone or computer in for repair due to a faulty chip? Inconveniences like this could be a thing of the past thanks to some engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

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model helicopterEngineering and computer science researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are developing an unmanned aerial vehicle that can collect water samples in dangerous or difficult-to-reach places.

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fiber opticsEngineers at Purdue University are researching †the use of ultra-fast light pulses to increase the speed and bandwidth of technology. As technology gets smaller and smaller, there will come a point where the components cannot be reduced any further.

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Shoes with no bodyThe invisibility cloak featured in the Harry Potter series is closer to becoming a reality, thanks to the work of researchers at Stanford University. The researchers developed a theoretical metamaterial that can interact with a wide range of light wavelengths and colors.

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Engineers at MIT are developing wearable tactile displays that may someday replace maps skinand GPS for their use in navigation.†Using the skin as a medium of communication, vibrations from a wearable GPS-linked device would tell the wearer when and where to turn and when to stop. The researchers are currently testing the displays on various parts of the body to assess accuracy.

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Engineering students at Washington State University are developing an unmanned aerial vehicle powered by liquid hydrogen. The focus on hydrogen power came after the successful flight of a 55 pound battery-powered plane known as GENII. Hydrogen is environmentally friendly, but extracting energy from it can be a challenge. The plane employs a†PM fuel cell to convert hydrogen and oxygen from the air into power.†Unmanned planes could be used in applications such as farming, wildfire monitoring, or emergency communications networks.

 

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Researchers at Washington State University’s School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering are working to engineer safer sports balls. The group developed a virtual softball model

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