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TryEngineering Today!

TryEngineering Today! is dedicated to providing the latest news and information for students, parents, teachers, and counselors interested in engineering, computing technology and related topics.

May 20, 2016 | Announcements, Innovations

 2015 IEEE Presidents' Scholarship winner, Alex Tacescu's Project Maverick was recently featured on The Tonight Show. Project Maverick is an omni-directional robotic system designed to provide a mobility solution for people with walking disabilities by mimicking the movement patterns of humans. The drive system allows the user to move in any direction using 4 steering and 4 driving electronically synchronized motors, creating the same degrees of motion as an able person. The IEEE Foundation established the IEEE Presidents' Scholarship fund to accept donations to support the financial resources students need to pursue their engineering dreams. 

computer worm
May 13, 2016 | Announcements

Unlock the intriguing world of cybersecurity in this issue of IEEE Spark. Learn about data protection techniques, meet a cybersecurity expert, practice code breaking, and check out resources to build your cyber skills. 

Read this issue!

sprouts
May 9, 2016 | Innovations

Having enough food to eat might be considered a basic human right, but millions of people in poor areas go hungry because they’re not able to grow enough food for themselves, let alone have a surplus to bring to market.

Three Engineering Projects in Community Service in IEEE (EPICS in IEEE) are applying simple, inexpensive technologies to help people cultivate food to feed themselves. Rather than work on a problem posed in a classroom, EPICS in IEEE matches IEEE volunteers and student members with high school students to work in collaboration with community-based organizations on engineering-related projects. 

Read the rest of this article at The Institute Online

May 2, 2016 | Announcements

1-7 May 2016

TryEngineering would like to offer a great big THANK YOU to educators around the globe for the impact you make on the lives of students each and every day. We thank you for the work you do supporting and inspiring our future generation of innovators, thought leaders, and world changers. We are proud to support you!

Take time this week (and all year round) to thank a special teacher who has made a difference in your life. 

three girls playing video games
May 2, 2016 | Student Opportunities

The National STEM Video Game Challenge is open for student submissions of original, playable video games and game design documents. The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, E-Line Media, and founding sponsor the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) aim to motivate interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) among youth by transforming their natural passions for playing video games into designing and creating their own. This year the STEM Challenge also welcomes its newest sponsor, the National Geographic Society, along with its supporting sponsors the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Grable Foundation.

The STEM Challenge is open to middle school and high school students in the U.S. in grades five through twelve. Students may enter as individuals or as teams of up to four members. Entries can be created using any game creation platform such as Gamestar Mechanic, Unity, GameMaker, and Scratch or as a written game design document.

The deadline to submit entries is August 15, 2016. Each winner will receive a cash prize of $1,000, as well as game design and educational software. Student winners will be invited to a special event at National Geographic in Washington, DC in November 2016.

Learn more and enter at: http://stemchallenge.org/

"Intro to Systems Biology," is a new FREE massive open online course (MOOC) from IEEE and edX. In this exciting new course, you will learn about systems biology, a holistic approach to understanding biological complexity, focusing on how all of the parts of a system work together. This course will teach you the basic concepts of systems biology, including engineering principles and tools developed for dynamic systems (e.g., robots) to better model and understand biological dynamics.

This course is geared towards secondary/ high school STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) educators and students. Basic programming skills will be taught in a step-wise manner so no prior programming experience or knowledge is necessary.

What you'll learn

  • Key concepts of systems biology
  • Introduction to dynamic systems
  • Gene circuit modeling in both logical and physical domains
  • Basic programming skills through the Octave Online platform

The course starts on Saturday, 16 April 2016

Register today at: https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-systems-biology-ieeex-sysbio1x

 

 

USA Science & Engineering Festival Logo

If you will be in the Washington D.C. area this weekend, check out the USA Science & Engineering Festival at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

The event will be held on April 15-17, 2016 and will give over 1,000 STEM organizations from all over the United States the opportunity to present hands-on, fun science activities to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers. 

Stop by the Expo Hall and visit the IEEE-USA booth number 661. Play a Theremin, meet Dr. Volt, and crank the dynamo to learn how much power it takes to light incandescent, LED, and CFL bulbs. Learn more about engineering careers and how engineers are shaping our future. Take a selfie at the selfie station, grab some engineering goodies and have fun! 

The event is free of charge. Sneak Peek Friday will take place on April 15, 2016 

March 23, 2016 | Innovations

Chemical engineers at Stanford University have developed technology aimed at making contact lenses more comfortable. Dry eyes caused by contact lenses occur when moisture protecting the surface of the eye, known as the tear film, breaks up in a process known as dewetting. The researchers found that the oily layer on the surface of the tear film plays an important role in providing strength and flexibility to the water beneath, as well as preventing evaporation. They recognized that the key to developing comfortable contacts, is creating lenses that do not break up the tear film. Based on these findings, the researchers developed a device that mimics the tear film on the surface of the eye. The device will enable scientists and manufacturers to test the effects of different variables on the tear film, such as materials, humidity and gravity, when creating the next generation of contact lenses.    

coloring concept
March 18, 2016 | Announcements

Explore these five exciting new lesson plans offered by TryEngineering.org!

Animation with Object Efficiency - This lesson shows how an object made of connected parts can be animated by displaying it as a series of graphic images.

Sorting Socks is Algorithm Complexity - This lesson introduces some simple ideas about algorithms and their complexity through a series of exercises involving a collection of socks. 

Data Representation: Millions of Colors - By first creating, and then playing a card game, students learn how additive color is represented as binary and hexadecimal numbers. 

Vector Graphics Use Functions - This lesson introduces vector graphics and functions through a collaborative design activity. 

Coloring Discrete Structures - This lesson introduces students to areas of mathematics that computer scientists use to do computational problems. Search techniques through discrete structures are illustrated through graph traversal and graph coloring. 

There are now over 130 FREE engineering, computing and technology-based lesson plans to choose from: http://tryengineering.org/lesson-plans

origami star and flower
March 10, 2016 | Innovations

Engineers at Brigham Young University are developing surgical instruments inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper-folding. The tools in development are so small that the incisions required to accommodate them would be able to heal without sutures. The origami-inspired designs involve fewer parts, enabling them to be both simpler and smaller. A robotically-controlled forceps designed by the team, is small enough to enter through an incision only 3mm in size! The researchers hope that someday these small instruments will enable surgeons to manipulate parts of the body as small and delicate as nerves. The tiny tools will also make surgeries less invasive, meaning less pain and faster healing time for patients.

 

 

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